Indian Big Pharma: Unveiling the Hidden Dangers

Unmasking the Silent Killers: Investigating the Dark Side of Indian Big Pharma and the Hidden Dangers Lurking in Sri Lanka's Healthcare System

2 mins read
[ Illustration credit: bizzbuzz.news ]

by a Special Correspondent

The alarming incidents of medical complications and fatalities in Sri Lanka linked to drugs manufactured in India have brought the spotlight onto the country’s pharmaceutical industry. These distressing events raise crucial questions about the quality control measures in place and demand immediate action from both Indian pharmaceutical manufacturers and Sri Lanka’s health authorities. The time has come to address the hidden dangers posed by Indian Big Pharma and prioritize the safety and well-being of patients.

Sri Lanka has heavily relied on India as a major source of medical supplies, with nearly half of its pharmaceutical imports originating from its neighboring nation. However, recent events have exposed the persistent challenges faced by Sri Lanka’s health sector. A critical shortage of drugs, exacerbated by the country’s economic meltdown, has compounded the issue. Furthermore, serious concerns regarding the quality of available drugs have raised doubts about the efficiency of Sri Lanka’s national drug regulator.

The tragic death of a patient at the Peradeniya Teaching Hospital in the Kandy district, resulting from an Indian-manufactured anaesthetic, serves as a somber reminder of the risks associated with imported drugs. Similarly, the loss of a pregnant woman’s life after receiving an Indian anaesthetic has emphasized the urgent need for thorough investigation and stringent quality control measures. Additionally, reports of visual impairment among patients who received Indian medicines after eye surgery at the general hospital in Nuwara Eliya have further sounded the alarm. These incidents demand immediate attention and action from the highest levels of government and health authorities.

The incidents in Sri Lanka are not isolated cases. Disturbing reports from Gambia and Uzbekistan have previously linked Indian-made cough syrups to the deaths of numerous children. In Gambia, 70 children tragically lost their lives due to contaminated cough syrups, while Uzbekistan reported 19 fatalities. These distressing precedents highlight the urgent need for improved quality standards, rigorous regulatory oversight, and international accountability within the Indian pharmaceutical industry.

Addressing the hidden dangers posed by Indian-manufactured drugs necessitates a collaborative effort from both Indian pharmaceutical companies and Sri Lanka’s health authorities. Indian manufacturers must implement stringent quality control measures and adhere to international standards to ensure the safety and efficacy of their products. Regular inspections, rigorous audits, and robust adherence to good manufacturing practices (GMP) are essential to restore trust in Indian-made medications.

For Sri Lanka, bolstering the capabilities of the national drug regulator is paramount. Strengthening the regulatory framework, allocating adequate resources, and fostering effective coordination among different agencies involved in drug quality control are imperative steps. Additionally, diversifying import sources and forging partnerships with countries renowned for their robust pharmaceutical industries can help mitigate risks associated with overreliance on a single supplier.

The incidents of medical complications and fatalities in Sri Lanka linked to drugs manufactured in India have shed light on the hidden dangers posed by Indian Big Pharma. It is essential for both Indian pharmaceutical manufacturers and Sri Lanka’s health authorities to take immediate action to ensure the safety and well-being of patients. By implementing stringent quality control measures, strengthening regulatory frameworks, and fostering international collaborations, both nations can work together to unveil and mitigate the hidden dangers lurking within the Indian pharmaceutical industry. Only then can the health and lives of patients be effectively safeguarded.

Sri Lanka Guardian

The Sri Lanka Guardian is an online web portal founded in August 2007 by a group of concerned Sri Lankan citizens including journalists, activists, academics and retired civil servants. We are independent and non-profit. Email: editor@slguardian.org

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