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Sri Lanka: Mudalige’s Affair

The studentship of Mr Wasantha Mudalige has been cancelled according to the by-laws governing universities in this country. The maximum time given to a student to complete his first degree if it is a special degree is seven years, but Mr Mudalige is completing his ninth year as a so-called university student.

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Wasantha Mudalige with a member of his student union, Inter University Students' Federation [ Photo: Special Arrangement ]

Editorial

Mr Wasantha Mudalige, who is said to be the convener of a certain student union, is currently in custody and national and international parties are giving priority to distorting the truth and propagating different opinions. According to a UN official, Mudalige is not only a student activist but a human rights defender too. Bravo. But no one talks about the damage caused to the state by these people who boast of fair justice. Is the UN official indirectly saying that these so-called human rights defenders should be given the freedom to rally the people against the state and damage state property?

We ask you to leave your prejudgments and think rationally before expressing your views on such vital incidents of national interest and matters of nationhood. Case in point, there is one foreign lady who came to Sri Lanka on a medical visa. She accepted before the law that she has violated the visa conditions. But, mocking the laws and judiciary she went underground. Laughably, those who are standing with her now say that she is a human rights defender and trying to bring “system change” in Sri Lanka. Do we have to buy these opinions and let this country go to misery with these “opinion makers”? Where are the UN representatives or the diplomatic corps crying out for justice?

Let us now focus on Mr Mudalige’s case briefly. First of all, it is important to find out whether the student union of which Mr Mudalige is the convener is a legally abided organization. As far as we know, this is an organization with an extreme political agenda that was set up to unnecessarily interfere in the internal affairs of universities that do not belong to any legal framework. On the other hand, the studentship of Mr Wasantha Mudalige has been cancelled according to the by-laws governing state universities. The maximum time given to a student to complete his first degree if it is a special degree is seven years, but Mr Mudalige is completing his ninth year as a so-called university student. A person whose studentship has been legally rescinded cannot even enter a university without authorized permission. So should we talk about the legality of this kind of personality leading a student organization without any legal recognition? Should such people be allowed to destroy the country’s public university system in the name of protecting human rights? Should the responsible institutions of the international community continue to play hide-and-seek without prioritizing the truth?

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