Driving Change in French Politics?

If current popularity polls are accurate, Marine Le Pen, after many attempts, could become President of France.

1 min read
During the announcement of the results of the second round of the legislative elections, at the La France Insoumise electoral evening, in Paris, July 7. LAURENCE GEAI / MYOP FOR LE MONDE

Now that the General Election in Britain has ended, Brits are prepared to witness significant changes in the coming years. Labour has won 412 seats while the Conservatives have lost 250 seats, shifting attention across the Channel to France.

Amidst electoral anger and amidst an unpredictable and unstable President Emmanuel Macron, observers speculate that Macron could resign after Sunday’s second round parliamentary elections.

Voting closed at 6 p.m. (1600 GMT) in small towns and cities, and at 8 p.m. in larger cities.

Final polls suggest Marine Le Pen’s far-right National Rally (RN), which led in the first round of elections last week, is poised for power. Jordan Bardella, the 28-year-old leader of the party, stated that they will only accept an absolute majority.

However, there is a possibility that they may fall short of the 289 seats required for an absolute majority, potentially leading France towards a hung parliament and political uncertainty. This would necessitate a coalition government ranging from hard-left to center parties.

Regardless of the final outcome, Macron’s political agenda appears to be in jeopardy five years before the end of his presidency.

If the Nationalist RN secures a majority, it would mark France’s first right-wing government since World War II, which could send shockwaves throughout the European Union.

If current popularity polls are accurate, Marine Le Pen, after many attempts, could become President of France.

Meanwhile, there is speculation that the Socialists and Communists could form a “republican front” with Macron’s depleted centrist camp and center-right Republican MPs who have not aligned with Ms. Le Pen.

Victor Cherubim

Victor Cherubim is a London-based writer and a frequent columnist of the Sri Lanka Guardian

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