/

India Faces Accusations of Undermining Sri Lanka’s Sovereignty

The Frontline Socialist Party vehemently urges the Sri Lankan government to withdraw from this project immediately. Citizens are implored to reject the new electronic identity card and to refrain from providing any personal information to it.

2 mins read
Madras Security Printers also bears the dubious distinction of being blacklisted in countries such as Kenya, Liberia, and Sudan, primarily for its interference with an e-ID project in the Philippines.

In a startling revelation, the Frontline Socialist Party (FSP) has sounded the alarm on what it calls a sinister plot to undermine Sri Lanka’s sovereignty by turning it into a digital colony of India. The alleged conspiracy revolves around the acquisition of all Sri Lankan citizens’ data under the guise of providing electronic identity cards, a claim made in a recent press conference held in Kandy by the party’s education secretary, Pubudu Jayagoda.

This controversial scheme traces its roots back to 2013 when the Mahinda Rajapaksa administration introduced the electronic identity card bill, a move that was met with fierce public opposition. However, it was ultimately passed in 2015 with the unanimous approval of all political parties in the parliament.

Recent revelations suggest that the real intentions behind this electronic identity card project may go beyond domestic governance. With a staggering cost of 41.05 billion rupees to provide electronic identity cards to the Sri Lankan population, India offered a significant grant of 22.33 billion rupees on the condition that an Indian company would be entrusted with the project. The consequences of such an agreement are nothing short of alarming.

If this project proceeds as planned, India would have access to a treasure trove of sensitive biometric data, including facial features, family lineage, medical histories, and even bank account information of every citizen in Sri Lanka. It’s a situation that eerily mirrors colonialism, with Sri Lanka potentially becoming a digital vassal state.

Furthermore, India’s economic entanglement with Sri Lanka has raised eyebrows. In a bid to address Sri Lanka’s economic crisis, India extended a loan of 4 billion dollars, a move that some argue could be viewed as a strategic manoeuvre to gain undue influence over the island nation. This situation is beginning to resemble a digital invasion rather than a financial bailout.

The tender for this project was initiated on May 8th of this year, and its deadline was subject to suspicious alterations. Originally set for July 3rd, it was postponed multiple times, shifting from August 14th to July 18th and then August 1st before finally settling on August 2nd. The reasons behind these mysterious changes are yet to be disclosed.

Notably, only two Indian companies, Madras Security Printers and Protein Technologies, submitted tender bids by the August 2nd deadline. Other firms were deterred by what has been described as absurd tender conditions, particularly regarding unlimited liability. Protein Technologies, one of the bidders, was disqualified due to its lack of a base ID project.

The imminent award of the tender to Madras Security Printers has raised eyebrows due to the company’s checkered history. In 2016, the same company was awarded a contract to print stickers for alcohol bottles, only to betray the public trust by selling those stickers to bootleg liquor producers. This illicit activity resulted in the loss of approximately 60 billion rupees in excise revenue per year, a revelation made by the Minister of Justice in the Sri Lankan Parliament.

Madras Security Printers also bears the dubious distinction of being blacklisted in countries such as Kenya, Liberia, and Sudan, primarily for its interference with an e-ID project in the Philippines. The implications are clear: India seems to be orchestrating a digital invasion of Sri Lanka through this tainted company.

In light of these concerning developments, the Frontline Socialist Party vehemently urges the Sri Lankan government to withdraw from this project immediately. Citizens are implored to reject the new electronic identity card and to refrain from providing any personal information to it. The fate of Sri Lanka’s sovereignty hangs in the balance, and the world watches with bated breath as this high-stakes digital drama unfolds.

Sri Lanka Guardian

The Sri Lanka Guardian is an online web portal founded in August 2007 by a group of concerned Sri Lankan citizens including journalists, activists, academics and retired civil servants. We are independent and non-profit. Email: editor@slguardian.org

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Latest from Blog