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The Psychology of Crime in Economically Deprived Sri Lanka

Sensationalizing these crimes only leads to panic and despair among the public. The media should instead focus on empowering the people by providing them with information on how to identify warning signs and how to seek help in case of danger.

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A 23-year-old woman (pictured) was killed by her husband during an argument in Sabaragamuwa province. This tragic incident reflects the disturbing trend of rising domestic violence in the country. [Photo Credit: Lankadeepa]"

Editorial

The recent wave of crimes in the country is a disturbing reminder that despite the efforts of religious institutions to educate the public on the meaning of life, there are still those among us who choose to disregard the basic principles of morality and commit heinous acts. The reported killings of innocent government servants, teachers, and domestic partners are a grim reflection of the state of our society.

The various religious institutions in the country, including Buddhist, Islamic, Christian, and Hindu organizations, are all preaching the message of leading a meaningful life. However, it is apparent that the message is not reaching everyone. It is the responsibility of the government, social groups, and the media to join hands and address this issue before it gets out of hand.

Certainly, the psychology of crime in economically deprived societies is a complex issue that requires a multifaceted approach to address. Economic deprivation and inequality can cause feelings of hopelessness, frustration, and anger, leading to an increased risk of criminal behaviour. Additionally, economic hardship can cause a breakdown in social cohesion and increase the likelihood of conflict and violence.

The media, in particular, should play a crucial role in educating the public on how to prevent such crimes. Rather than merely reporting on the incidents, they should also offer advice to help prevent similar occurrences. Sensationalizing these crimes only leads to panic and despair among the public. The media should instead focus on empowering the people by providing them with information on how to identify warning signs and how to seek help in case of danger.

The government must also take a proactive approach to address this issue. Law enforcement agencies need to be more vigilant and take stern action against those who violate the law. The government should also increase funding for crime prevention initiatives and support community-based programs that promote social cohesion and strengthen the fabric of society.

It is also the responsibility of the general public to be vigilant and report suspicious activities to the relevant authorities. We cannot turn a blind eye to these crimes and hope that they will go away on their own. It is only by working together that we can overcome this challenge and build a society that is safe and secure for all.

Addressing the root causes of crime in economically deprived societies requires a coordinated effort from responsible people in society. By creating economic opportunities, providing social support, promoting education and training, building community, and encouraging conflict resolution, we can create a more just and equitable society, where everyone has the opportunity to lead a fulfilling life free from the fear of crime.

The recent spate of crimes in the country is a wake-up call for everyone. We cannot afford to sit back and watch as our society crumbles around us. It is time for the government, social groups, the media, and the general public to come together and take decisive action to prevent these crimes from occurring. We must work together to promote a culture of peace, respect, and harmony, and ensure that everyone can lead a meaningful life, free from fear and violence.

Sri Lanka Guardian

The Sri Lanka Guardian is an online web portal founded in August 2007 by a group of concerned Sri Lankan citizens including journalists, activists, academics and retired civil servants. We are independent and non-profit. Email: editor@slguardian.org

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